8 March 2017

Iconic rock arch from 'Game of Thrones' falls into Malta sea

This is a April 2014 image of the landmark the Azure Window located just off Malta. The natural rock arch jutting off the Maltese island of Gozo, has collapsed into the sea during a storm. Malta’s prime minister called the loss on Wednesday March 8, 2017, of the iconic limestone formation “heartbreaking.” No one was injured by the fallen arch, which was also a TV and film backdrop.
The Azure Window, a natural rock arch which jutted onto the sea off Malta and was a backdrop for the "Game of Thrones" TV series, has collapsed in a storm.

Malta Prime Minister Joseph Muscat tweeted his "heartbreaking" sadness at the loss Wednesday of one of the main tourist attractions on the island of Gozo.

In world first, Iceland to require firms to prove equal pay

This is a Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 file photo of people looking at the Icelandic parliament the Althing in Reykjavik. Iceland will be the first country in the world to make employers prove they offer equal pay regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality, the Nordic nation's government said on International Women's Day , Wednesday March 8, 2017.
Iceland will be the first country in the world to make employers prove they offer equal pay regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality, the Nordic nation's government said Wednesday — International Women's Day.

The government said it will introduce legislation to parliament this month, requiring all employers with more than 25 staff to obtain certification to prove they give equal pay for work of equal value.

Acid victims redefine beauty in Bangladesh fashion show

In this March 7, 2017 photo, a Bangladeshi acid attack survivor gets her make up applied during the event 'Beauty Redefined' in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Organizers said they hoped to highlight the fact that acid victims, too often overlooked, are a vital part of society. They deliberately chose to hold the event on the eve of International Women’s Day.
Teen model Shonali Khatun strutted the catwalk as the audience cheered at a fashion show in Bangladesh's capital.

But Shonali is no ordinary model, and this was no ordinary show.

She and the 14 other models are survivors of acid attacks, common in this South Asian country, where spurned lovers or disgruntled family members sometimes resort to hurling skin-burning acid at their victims.

WikiLeaks reveals CIA files describing hacking tools

This is Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 file photo of the new CIA Director Michael Pompeo, as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. WikiLeaks has published thousands of documents that it says come from the CIA's Center for Cyber Intelligence, a dramatic release that appears to give an eye-opening look at the intimate details of the agency's cyberespionage effort. 
WikiLeaks published thousands of documents Tuesday described as secret files about CIA hacking tools the government employs to break into users' computers, mobile phones and even smart TVs from companies like Apple, Google, Microsoft and Samsung.

The documents describe clandestine methods for bypassing or defeating encryption, antivirus tools and other protective security features intended to keep the private information of citizens and corporations safe from prying eyes. U.S. government employees, including President Donald Trump, use many of the same products and internet services purportedly compromised by the tools.

Hungary blasted for rule detaining refugees in containers

In this Sept. 21, 2016 file photo a Hungarian soldier patrols at the transit zone at Hungary's southern border with Serbia near Tompa, 169 km southeast of Budapest, Hungary. Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban, an early supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump, has ordered the reinforcement of fences on Hungary’s southern borders to keep out migrants, many of whom are Muslims.
Hungary adopted tough new rules on Tuesday allowing authorities to detain all asylum-seekers, including women and children fleeing war and poverty, in border camps built from shipping containers. Human rights groups said the decision was a "flagrant violation of international law."

In the eyes of Hungary's combative prime minister, Viktor Orban, an early supporter of U.S. President Donald Trump, migrants are a "Trojan horse of terrorism," putting his country under siege. He considers the migrants, many of whom are Muslims, as a threat to Europe's Christian identity and culture.