19 February 2017

IMF agrees terms for $5 billion loan to debt-ridden Mongolia

Bayartsaikhan Nadmid, Governor of the Bank of Mongolia, left, listens as Choijilsuren Battogtokh, Mongolia's Minister of Finance, right, speaks at a press conference in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017. The Mongolian government and envoys from the International Monetary Fund said Sunday that they and other partners have agreed on terms for a more than $5 billion loan package to the north Asian country to help get its economy back on track.
The Mongolian government and envoys from the International Monetary Fund said Sunday that they and other partners have agreed on terms for a more than $5 billion loan package to the north Asian country to help get its economy back on track.
The deal is subject to approval by the IMF's executive board, which is expected to consider Mongolia's request in March.

Blind cleric behind 1990s terror plots dies in US prison

This April 6, 1993 file photo shows Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman in New York. Kenneth McKoy of the Federal Correction Complex in Butner, N.C., said Abdel-Rahman died Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, after a long battle with diabetes and coronary artery disease. Abdel-Rahman was sentenced to life in prison after his 1995 conviction for his advisory role in a plot to blow up landmarks, including the United Nations, and several bridges and tunnels.
Omar Abdel-Rahman, the so-called Blind Sheik convicted of plotting terror attacks in New York City in the decade before 9/11 and spiritual guide to a generation of Islamic militants, has died in a federal prison. He was 78.
Abdel-Rahman, who had diabetes and coronary artery disease, died Saturday at the Federal Correction Complex in Butner, North Carolina, said its acting executive assistant, Kenneth McKoy. The inmate spent seven years at the prison medical facility while serving a life sentence.
"We are saddened by your departure, father," the cleric's daughter, Asmaa, tweeted in Arabic.

New Gambian president promises reforms, freedoms

In this Thursday Jan. 26, 2017 file photo, Gambia President Adama Barrow waves as he rides his motorcade through crowds of hundreds of thousands after arriving at Banjul airport in Gambia, after flying in from Dakar, Senegal. Gambia's new president is set to be inaugurated Saturday Feb. 18, 2017, as this tiny West African nation celebrates wider freedoms after a tense political standoff with its former leader.
Gambia's new president promised greater freedom, an improved economy and better education as thousands attended a ceremony Saturday marking his inauguration after a tense political standoff with the country's former longtime leader.
"This is a victory for democracy. It is a victory for all Gambians," President Adama Barrow said to a packed stadium near the capital that included dignitaries and several African heads of state.