16 January 2017

Eyewear giant to emerge from tie-up of Luxottica, Essilor

This Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016 photo shows the logo of the Essilor a French ophthalmic optics company, in Charenton le Pont, east of Paris. Essilor International SA announced Monday Jan.16, 2017 it had reached a share exchange deal with Luxottica's main shareholder Delfin to create a combined company making both frames and lenses.
A new European eyewear giant worth more than 50 billion euros ($52.5 billion) is set to emerge as Italy's Luxottica — owner of Ray-Ban and Oakley glasses — merges with French lens manufacturer Essilor.
Essilor International SA said Monday it had reached a share exchange deal with Luxottica's main shareholder, Delfin, to create a combined company making both frames and lenses.
Shares jumped in both Luxottica, which is based in Milan, and Essilor, headquartered near Paris.

Kyrgyzstan: Cargo plane crash kills 37, destroys village

A Kyrgyz firefighter inspects a plane crash site outside Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. A Turkish Boeing 747 cargo plane crashed just outside the Manas airport Monday morning killing people in the residential area adjacent to the Manas airport as well as those on the plane.
A Turkish cargo plane crashed Monday in a residential area just outside the main airport in Kyrgyzstan, destroying half of a village and killing at least 37 people in the plane and on the ground, the Emergency Situations Ministry said.
The Boeing 747 crashed at 7:40 a.m. local time while approaching Manas airport, south of the capital, Bishkek, in this Central Asian nation.

South Korea seeks arrest of Samsung scion in graft scandal

In this Dec, 6, 2016 file photo, Lee Jae-yong, a vice chairman of Samsung Electronics Co. arrives for hearing at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea. The special prosecutors office said Monday, Jan. 16, 2017 that it requested an arrest warrant for Lee, the 48-year-old Samsung Electronics vice chairman as a bribery suspect in the influence-peddling scandal that led to the impeachment of South Korea's president.
In a departure from the leniency typically given South Korean big businesses, prosecutors on Monday requested the arrest of the de facto head of Samsung Electronics, the country's most valuable company, in an influence-peddling scandal that has toppled the country's president.
Lee Jae-yong, the 48-year-old vice chairman at Samsung Electronics, faces allegations of embezzlement, of lying under oath during a parliamentary hearing and of offering a bribe of 43 billion won ($36 million) to a long-time friend of impeached President Park Geun-hye, according to Lee Kyu-chul, a spokesman for a special prosecutors' team investigating the political scandal.

Death toll at 26 inmates from latest Brazil prison violence

Naked inmates stand in line while surrounded by police after a riot at the Alcacuz prison in Nisia Floresta, Rio Grande do Norte state, Brazil, Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017. Security authorities said Sunday they have regained control of two Brazilian prisons after several inmates were killed during a riot, the latest in a string of prison disturbances across the country.
Twenty-six inmates were killed in eruptions of violence inside two prisons in northern Brazil, officials said Sunday as they quelled the latest in a string of jail disturbances across the country in which more than 100 people died within two weeks.
The state security office for Rio Grande do Norte state had reported earlier in the day that there were 27 deaths, but later lowered that by one. It also said all bodies had now been counted.

Bahrain executes 3 over police bombing, triggering protests

In this Friday, March 14, 2014 file photo, Bahraini anti-government protesters burn representations of the flag of Gulf countries' Peninsula Shield forces, during a protest in Malkiya, Bahrain. Bahraini authorities say they have put to death three men found guilty of a deadly attack on police, the kingdom's first executions since an Arab Spring-inspired uprising rocked the country in 2011.
Bahrain on Sunday carried out its first executions since an Arab Spring uprising rocked the country in 2011, putting to death three men found guilty of a deadly bomb attack on police.
The executions of the Shiite men drew swift condemnation from human rights groups and sparked intense protests by opponents of the Sunni-ruled government, who see the charges as politically motivated. Activists allege that testimony used against the condemned men was obtained through torture.