14 June 2016

For the Kermit Sutra? New mating position reported for frogs

This undated photo provided S.D. Biju on June 7, 2016 shows Bombay night frogs in the newly-discovered dorsal straddle during mating in a forest in the Maharashtra state of India. For years, scientists have thought that frogs and toads used only six positions to mate. In a paper published Tuesday, June 14, 2016 by the journal PeerJ, Biju of the University of Delhi and co-authors documented a seventh.
This just in from the Department of Amphibian Philandering:
For years, scientists have thought frogs and toads used only six positions to mate. It turns out they may be wrong. In a forest in India, researchers say, they've documented a seventh.
This latest entry in the Kermit Sutra is called the dorsal straddle. Like other positions — but unlike mammal sex — it's aimed at letting the male fertilize eggs outside the female's body.

Scientific robots to swim in Bay of Bengal in monsoon study

In this July 16, 2013 file photo, Hindu priests offer prayers to Varuna, the Hindu god of rain as they pray for rains standing in the waters at the Osman Sagar Lake on the outskirts of Hyderabad, India.The seasonal monsoon, which hits the region between June and September, delivers more than 70 percent of India's annual rainfall. Its arrival is eagerly awaited by hundreds of millions of subsistence farmers across the country, and delays can ruin crops or exacerbate drought.In an effort to better understand and predict South Asia's seasonal monsoon, British scientists are getting ready to release robots into the Bay of Bengal in a study of how ocean conditions might affect rainfall patterns.
To better understand and predict South Asia's seasonal monsoon, scientists are getting ready to release robots in the Bay of Bengal in a study of how ocean conditions might affect rainfall patterns.
The monsoon, which hits between June and September, delivers more than 70 percent of India's annual rainfall. Its arrival is eagerly awaited by hundreds of millions of subsistence farmers, and delays can ruin crops or exacerbate drought.