13 June 2016

Microsoft to buy networking site LinkedIn for $26.2 billion

In this Nov. 6, 2014, file photo, LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner speaks during the company's second annual "Bring In Your Parents Day," at LinkedIn headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Microsoft said Monday, June 13, 2016, it is buying professional networking service site LinkedIn for about $26.2 billion. LinkedIn, based in Mountain View, Calif., has more than 430 million members.
In a surprise move, Microsoft said Monday that it is buying LinkedIn for about $26.2 billion, a deal that could bring subtle but significant changes for the professional network's more than 430 million members.
LinkedIn will remain an independent unit of Microsoft. It will keep its name, and current CEO Jeff Weiner will stay on and report directly to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. LinkedIn lets members network with other professionals, upload their resumes, catch up on career advice and search for jobs.

Ancient urban networks around Angkor Wat discovered

In this July 14, 2014 file photo, tourists look at the view of the Angkor Wat temples at sunrise, outside Siem Reap, Cambodia. An Australian archeologist says he and colleagues have found evidence of previously undiscovered medieval urban and agricultural networks surrounding the ancient city of Angkor Wat. Using high-tech lasers to scan the Cambodian jungle, Damian Evans and colleagues say they found traces of extensive networks surrounding the monumental stone temple complex at Angkor Wat.
An Australian archaeologist says he and colleagues have found evidence of previously undiscovered medieval urban and agricultural networks surrounding the ancient city of Angkor Wat.
Using high-tech lasers to scan the Cambodian jungle, Damian Evans and colleagues say they found traces of extensive networks surrounding the monumental stone temple complex at Angkor Wat. Evans said their findings could further our understanding of Khmer culture and throw into question traditional assumptions about the 15th-century decline of the empire.

Court clears Bollywood drug film for release with just 1 cut

In this June 8, 2016 file photo, Bollywood film "Udta Punjab," or "Flying Punjab" actors Shahid Kapoor, left, and Alia Bhatt listen to a question during a press conference, in Mumbai, India. The Bollywood movie about drug abuse in India's northern state of Punjab has been cleared for viewing after its director was ordered to cut several scenes.
A Bollywood movie about drug abuse in India's northern state of Punjab can be released in theaters across the country with one potentially offensive scene removed, rather than the many cuts sought by censors, a court ruled Monday.
The decision was being hailed by the Hindi-language film industry based in Mumbai as a victory for the creative arts and the fundamental rights of filmmakers.

Late goal lifts Peru 1-0, eliminates Brazil in Copa America

Brazil's Philippe Coutinho, left, and Peru's Christian Cueva (10) chase the ball during the first half of a Copa America Group B soccer match on Sunday, June 12, 2016, in Foxborough, Mass.
Peru's recent history against Brazil is marked by lots of losses and a few missed opportunities.

That changed in a big way Sunday night — with the help from a fortunate non-call.

Peru stunned Brazil 1-0, eliminating the soccer power from Copa America on a late goal by Raul Ruidiaz that may have been a hand ball. It was Peru's first victory over the perennial power since 1985, and gave Peru the Group B title and a quarterfinal match against Colombia on Friday.

Worst mass shooting in US history: 50 slain at gay nightclub

Orlando Police officers direct family members away from a fatal shooting at Pulse Orlando nightclub in Orlando, Fla., Sunday, June 12, 2016.
It had been an evening of drinking, dancing and drag shows. After hours of revelry, the party-goers crowding the gay nightclub known as the Pulse took their last sips before the place closed.
That's when authorities say Omar Mateen emerged, carrying an AR-15 and spraying the helpless crowd with bullets. Witnesses said he fired relentlessly — 20 rounds, 40, then 50 and more. In such tight quarters, the bullets could hardly miss. He shot at police. He took hostages.