22 February 2016

Zuckerberg to press on with Internet access despite setback

In this March 2, 2015 file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a conference at the Mobile World Congress, the world's largest mobile phone trade show in Barcelona, Spain. Zuckerberg likes to boast that his 3-year-old effort to connect the developing world to the Internet has reached millions of people in some of the world’s poorest nations. But a central element of his Internet.org campaign was controversial even before it was shut down in a key market this month. Indian regulators banned one of the pillars of the campaign, a service known as Free Basics, because it provided access only to certain pre-approved services - including Facebook - rather than the full Internet.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg vowed Monday to press on with his 3-year-old effort to bring the developing world online, even after Indian regulators banned one of the pillars of the campaign.
He said the banned service, Free Basics, was only one program in his Internet.org campaign, so he could proceed with other initiatives. Indian regulators banned Free Basics this month because it provided access only to certain pre-approved services — including Facebook — rather than the full Internet.

Protests that led to caste violence in north India near end

Indian military guard the Munak canal, near the village of Bindroli, in the northern state of Haryana, Monday, Feb. 22, 2016. Fears of a water crisis in the Indian capital eased Monday with security forces securing a canal in Haryana state, which provides 60 percent of its water needs.
Authorities in a north Indian state on Monday began lifting curfews in key towns and protesters gradually removed roadblocks after 12 people died in clashes during their demonstrations for government benefits.
Government forces also secured a canal in Haryana state, which provides 60 percent of New Delhi's water needs, easing fears of a shortage in the Indian capital. New Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal said engineers were repairing portions of a reservoir damaged by protesters.

Protests that led to caste violence in north India near end

Indian military guard the Munak canal, near the village of Bindroli, in the northern state of Haryana, Monday, Feb. 22, 2016. Fears of a water crisis in the Indian capital eased Monday with security forces securing a canal in Haryana state, which provides 60 percent of its water needs.
Authorities in a north Indian state have begun lifting a curfew in key towns and protesters have removed roadblocks after clashes left 12 people dead during their demonstrations for government benefits.
Government forces also Monday secured a canal in Haryana state, which provides 60 percent of New Delhi's water needs, easing fears of a shortage. New Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal said engineers were repairing portions of a reservoir damaged by protesters.