21 February 2016

Deadly north India protests lead to New Delhi water shortage

Indian army soldiers conduct a flag march past damaged buildings at Rohtak, a day after being rocked by violence in Haryana state, India, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Hundreds of army and paramilitary soldiers on Saturday tried to quell protests by angry mobs demanding government benefits in the northern Indian state, with at least four people killed in clashes between security forces and protesters, officials said.
Authorities in India's capital have closed schools and taken other measures to combat water supply problems caused by violent protests in a neighboring state that have left at least 12 people dead.
Thousands of members of an underprivileged community who are protesting to demand government benefits have damaged equipment that brings water from the Munak canal in Haryana state to New Delhi, depleting the capital's water supply. New Delhi, a city of more than 16 million people, gets about 60 percent of its water from Haryana state.

6 dead in Kashmir standoff between Indian forces and rebels

Indian army soldiers arrive at the site of a gun battle, on the outskirts of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Islamic militants fired automatic rifles at a convoy of Indian paramilitary soldiers in the Indian portion of Kashmir on Saturday, before taking refuge in a nearby government building, police said.
A handful of rebels holed up in a building in the Indian portion of Kashmir exchanged fire with government forces for the second straight day Sunday in a standoff that has left five soldiers and one civilian dead.
The rebels, numbering two to three, fired guns and grenades from the government building where they have been hiding since Saturday, said paramilitary spokesman Bhavesh Chaudhary.

5 dead in Kashmir standoff between Indian forces and rebels

An Indian army soldiers watches from distance as he takes position behind a wall near the site of a gun battle, on the outskirts of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Islamic militants fired automatic rifles at a convoy of Indian paramilitary soldiers in the Indian portion of Kashmir on Saturday, before taking refuge in a nearby government building, police said.
A handful of rebels holed up in a building in the Indian portion of Kashmir exchanged fire with government forces for the second straight day Sunday, raising the number of dead to four soldiers and one civilian. Another 13 paramilitary troops have been wounded in the standoff.
The rebels, numbering two to three, fired guns and grenades early Sunday as Indian commandos tried to storm the government building where they have been hiding since Saturday, said paramilitary spokesman Bhavesh Chaudhary.

6 dead in protests for caste benefits in northern India

Protesters vandalize and damage vehicles during a pro caste quota protest in Rohtak, 70 kilometers (45 miles) west of New Delhi, India, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. India's paramilitary forces shot and killed one person on Friday as protests for government benefits turned violent in northern India, police said. Thousands of people belonging to the Jat agricultural community were protesting in Rohtak and other towns in Haryana state, to demand an increase in their caste quota benefits, which include guaranteed government jobs or university spots.
Hundreds of Indian security forces imposed a curfew and were ordered to fire without warning in a bid to quell protests by members of an underprivileged community demanding government benefits in a northern state, where at least six people have died in clashes, officials said.

The violence raged for a second straight day Saturday and protesters burned several railroad stations and attacked shops and vehicles in several towns in Haryana state, said police officer Y.P. Singhal.

Umberto Eco, author of 'The Name of the Rose,' dead at 84

In this Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 file photo, Italian writer Umberto Eco is seen prior to a press conference at the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. Eco, best known for the international best-seller “The Name of the Rose,” died Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. He was 84.
Umberto Eco catapulted to global literary fame three decades ago with "The Name of the Rose," a novel in which professorial erudition underpinned a medieval thriller that sold some 30 million copies in more than 40 languages.
The Italian author and academic who became one of Italy's best-known cultural exports and keenest cultural critics, died at home in Milan on Friday evening after a battle with cancer, according to a family member who asked not to be identified.
His death was earlier confirmed by his American publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.