26 January 2016

Malaysian PM cleared of wrongdoing in $700 million scandal

In this Monday, Jan. 25, 2016 photo, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak speaks at a conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Malaysia's attorney general said Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016, that nearly $700 million channeled into Najib's private accounts was a personal donation from Saudi Arabia's royal family, and cleared him of any criminal wrongdoing. The announcement capped months of uncertainty for Najib, who has come under intense pressure to resign over the financial scandal in his biggest political crisis since he took power in 2009.
Malaysia's attorney general said Tuesday that nearly $700 million channeled into Prime Minister Najib Razak's private accounts was a personal donation from Saudi Arabia's royal family, and cleared him of any criminal wrongdoing.
The announcement by Attorney General Mohamed Apandi Ali capped months of uncertainty for Najib, who has been fighting intense pressure to resign over the financial scandal in his biggest political crisis since he took power in 2009.

Hot yoga founder ordered to pay in harassment lawsuit

In this Sept. 27, 2003, file photo, Bikram Choudhury, front, founder of the Yoga College of India and creator and producer of Yoga Expo 2003, leads what organizers hope will be the world's largest yoga class at the Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center. A Los Angeles jury on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, ordered Choudhury to pay $924,500 in compensatory damages after finding he had subjected a lawyer to harassment and retaliation.
The founder of a popular hot yoga method on Monday was ordered to pay more than $900,000 to a lawyer who said she was fired for investigating allegations of sexual harassment against the guru.
A Los Angeles jury ordered Bikram Choudhury to pay the attorney $924,500 in compensatory damages after finding he had subjected her to harassment and retaliation. The jury is considering whether to award the attorney, Minakshi Jafa-Bodden, with punitive damages on Tuesday.

Twitter parts with 4 key execs in latest sign of turmoil

This Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, file photo, shows a Twitter app on an iPhone screen, in New York. Twitter says that four executives are leaving the company. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey posted Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, that Alex Roetter, Skip Schipper, Katie Stanton and Kevin Weil are exiting the company. Roetter served as senior vice president of engineering, Schipper was vice president of human resources, Stanton was vice president of social media and Weil was senior vice president of product.
Four of Twitter's key executives are leaving the company in an exodus that has escalated the uncertainty facing the messaging service as it struggles to broaden its audience and lure back disillusioned investors.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced the management shake-up late Sunday after technology news site Re/Code reported the changes earlier in the day.

Dorsey described the departures as voluntary, a characterization that three of the four exiting executives echoed in their own posts.