29 November 2015

Commonwealth seeks legally binding climate deal in Paris

From left, Prime Minister of Barbados Freundel Stuart, President of Ghana John Dramani Mahama, Commonwealth Secretary General Kamalesh Sharma, Malta's Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, President of Kenya Uhuru Kenyatta and President of Nauru Baron Divavesi Waqa attend a press conference at conclusion of the Commonwealth Heads of Governments meeting in Ghajn Tuffieha, Malta, Saturday, 29 Nov. 2015.
The 53-nation Commonwealth has said climate change poses an "existential threat" to some of its member states, and urged participants at the Paris climate talks to produce a legally binding agreement on cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
The Commonwealth — a grouping of Britain and many of its former colonies that is home to more than 2 billion people — includes industrialized economies such as Canada and Australia, resource-hungry India and small island states vulnerable to rising sea levels.

Energy-rich Russia pays little attention to climate change

Trees are cut along a construction site of a new highway in Moscow region in this Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015 photo. As the climate warms, moisture levels are changing with wet areas becoming wetter and dry areas drier. Russia is the fastest warming part of the world, according to a report from the country’s weather monitoring agency. The steady rise in temperatures puts Siberia- known for its long winters and lush forests- at risk to natural disasters, such forest fires.
When forest fires roared through Siberia this summer, so vast that the smoke blocked vast Lake Baikal from satellite view, Russian officials blamed the blazes on arsonists and disorganized fire crews. Environmentalists say there was another culprit: global warming.
As temperatures rise worldwide, areas such as Siberia are suffering increasingly long dry spells. Russia's national weather agency says the country is the fastest-warming part of the world.