6 October 2015

Nobel Prize for missing piece in neutrino mass puzzle

A screen shows the winners as members of the Nobel Assembly announce the winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics, in Stockholm, Tuesday Oct. 6, 2015. Takaaki Kajita of Japan and Arthur McDonald of Canada won the Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of neutrino oscillations. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the two researchers had made key contributions to experiments showing that neutrinos change identities.
Takaaki Kajita of Japan and Arthur McDonald of Canada won the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for discovering that tiny particles called neutrinos change identities as they whiz through the universe, proving that they have mass.
By uncovering the "chameleon-like" nature of neutrinos, the laureates had solved a long-standing puzzle in particle physics that could alter our grasp of the cosmos, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

AP PHOTOS: Kashmir's floating market reopens after floods

Kashmiri men take a break to chat while selling their produce at the floating vegetable market on Dal Lake in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. Vegetables traded in this floating market are supplied to Srinagar and many towns across the Kashmir valley. It's one of the major sources of income for the lake dwellers who spend years carefully nurturing their floating gardens from the weed and rich soil extracted from the lake bed.
Boats laden with fresh produce appear just after dawn, floating through a maze of waterways on Dal Lake in the main city of India's portion of Kashmir.
This is Kashmir's floating vegetable market, deep inside the lake and surrounded by scenic house boats and water lilies.