3 January 2015

Pakistan, India trade fire in Kashmir, killing 2

Indian Border Security Force (BSF) officers carry the coffin of their colleague who was killed in a India Pakistan cross border firing, in Jammu, India, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015. Indian and Pakistani troops exchanged fire Wednesday near the cease-fire line that divides the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir, leaving two dead on the Pakistani side and one on the Indian side, officials said.
Pakistani and Indian border guards traded artillery fire along the disputed border region of Kashmir, killing two people and wounding eight, officials said Saturday.
Both Pakistan and India blamed each other for starting the fire that began Friday night. This latest violence comes after Islamabad accused Indian forces of killing two of its soldiers Wednesday in a crossfire that also killed an Indian soldier.

Bollywood-Hollywood Lookalikes

Deepika Padukone and Irina Shayk 

Deepika Padukone and Irina Shayk

Political revolt roils Sri Lanka presidential vote

In this Dec. 24, 2014 photo, supporters hold portraits of Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa and cheer during an election campaign rally in Colombo, Sri Lanka. He was the president hailed as a king after crushing the Tamil Tiger rebels in 2009 and ending the island nation's 25-year civil war. But an internal revolt now threatens Rajapaksa's hold on power. Health Minister Maithripala Sirisena, a close Rajapaksa aide and the No. 2 person in the president's Freedom Party, defected in a secretly choreographed news conference in late November, announcing he would run as an opposition candidate in the Jan. 8, 2015 election. Posters read " Leader of the Common.”
Until just a few weeks ago, Sri Lanka's upcoming election seemed a mere formality. Nothing, it seemed, could keep President Mahinda Rajapaksa from rolling to a third term in office.
He was the president hailed as a king after crushing the Tamil Tiger rebels in 2009 and ending the island nation's 25-year civil war. He is a charismatic campaigner with vast campaign funds. He has turned the government into an extended family business, with politically powerful brothers, sons and nephews who can all help his candidacy.
But times change. Quickly.