25 November 2014

Thousands vote in Indian Kashmir amid boycott call

Kashmiris stand in queue to cast their votes outside a polling station during the first phase of voting to the Jammu and Kashmir state assembly elections at Shadipora, outskirts of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014. Thousands lined up to cast their votes amid a boycott call by Muslim separatist groups who reject India's sovereignty over the disputed Himalayan region.
Thousands of Kashmiris cast votes in state elections Tuesday despite a boycott call by Muslim separatist groups that reject India's sovereignty over the disputed Himalayan region.
Voter turnout was high at 70 percent despite cold temperatures and overcast skies, the Election Commission said. It described the first phase of the elections as "flawless" with no incidents marring the polls.
Paramilitary soldiers and police officers patrolled near polling stations.

Bollywood women soar but ask: Where's the money?

In this Aug. 23, 2014 file photo, Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra speaks during a promotional event for her film "Mary Kom" in Ahmadabad, India. This is Bollywood’s year of the woman. Some of the biggest hits in India's prolific movie industry this year have female leads in female-oriented stories. In “Mary Kom,” Chopra plays a female Olympic bronze-medal winning boxer. Previously, women were relegated to playing the male lead actor’s girlfriend, sister or mother in subservient roles reflecting the traditional dominance of men in Indian society. But for all their box-office success and newfound prominence, Bollywood actresses are asking: Where is the money?
This is Bollywood's year of the woman. Some of the biggest hits in India's prolific movie industry this year have female leads in female-oriented stories.
In this summer's surprise hit, "Queen," Kangana Ranaut is the spunky heroine who embarks on her honeymoon alone after she is jilted the day before her big fat Indian wedding. In "Mary Kom," Priyanka Chopra plays a female Olympic bronze medal-winning boxer. Previously, women were relegated to playing the male lead's girlfriend, sister or mother in subservient roles reflecting the traditional dominance of men in Indian society.