14 November 2014

Drug maker arrested in India sterilization deaths

Dr. R.K. Gupta, center, the doctor who conducted sterilization procedures after which at least a dozen women died, is interrogated by police in Bilaspur, India, Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Gupta insisted he didn't do anything wrong, even though he said he used to perform up to 10 times more surgeries a day than allowed. He had performed 83 surgeries in six hours, a clear breach of government protocol, which prohibits surgeons from performing more than 30 sterilizations in a day, Dr. S.K. Mandal, the chief medical officer of Chhattisgarh state said.
Indian police have arrested the director of a drug manufacturing firm that allegedly supplied medication to women in a mass sterilization that left 13 dead, news reports said Friday.
Press Trust of India reported that Ramesh Mahawar of Mahawar Pharma Pvt Ltd and his son were arrested and charged with fraud. Police Superintendent O.P. Pal told PTI that the men were arrested on the complaint of food and drug administration officials.

Shiite holy month sees show of strength in Baghdad

In this Monday, Nov. 10, 2014 photo, people pass under Shiite banners in Ghadeer district in southeastern Baghdad, Iraq. Religious banners and portraits of Imam Hussein, a grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, hang from homes, bridges, stores and even colleges across much of Baghdad and can be seen even in Sunni-majority areas. They also adorn government buildings and hundreds of security checkpoints across the city, reinforcing Sunni fears that Shiite Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi is no less sectarian than his predecessor Nouri al-Maliki, whose policies were widely seen as aggravating Sunni grievances.
Red and green Shiite banners line the streets of Baghdad, portraits of religious figures and slain "martyrs" stare down from billboards, hymns blare from shops and cafes, and grim-faced militiamen prowl the streets in pickup trucks.
The holy month of Muharram has brought an unprecedented show of strength by Iraq's Shiite Muslim majority, underscoring its domination of the bitterly fractured capital and the vulnerability of the once-dominant Sunnis, while raising fears of a new round of sectarian cleansing by Shiite militias allied with the government.

US, India end impasse that threatened WTO pact

An Indian woman harvests paddy in a paddy field on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, one of the world's largest grain exporters, Thursday, Nov. 13 2014. The United States and India said Thursday they had resolved a dispute over stockpiling of food by governments, clearing a major stumbling block to a deal to boost world trade. India had insisted on its right to subsidize grains under a national policy to support hundreds of millions of impoverished farmers and provide food security amid high inflation. The U.S. and others in the World Trade Organization, meanwhile, were more focused on ensuring their food exporters weren't disadvantaged by the possibility of surplus Indian grain flooding the world market.
The United States and India said Thursday they had resolved a dispute over stockpiling of food by the Indian government, clearing a major stumbling block to a deal to boost world trade.
India had insisted on its right to subsidize grains under a national policy to support hundreds of millions of impoverished farmers and provide food security amid high inflation.