13 November 2014

India doctor arrested, denies role in women deaths

Dr. R.K. Gupta, center, the doctor who conducted sterilization procedures after which at least a dozen women died, is interrogated by police in Bilaspur, India, Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Gupta insisted he didn't do anything wrong, even though he said he used to perform up to 10 times more surgeries a day than allowed. He had performed 83 surgeries in six hours, a clear breach of government protocol, which prohibits surgeons from performing more than 30 sterilizations in a day, Dr. S.K. Mandal, the chief medical officer of Chhattisgarh state said.
The doctor who conducted sterilization procedures after which 13 women died in central India was arrested, but insisted he didn't do anything wrong — even though he said he used to perform up to 10 times more surgeries a day than allowed.
Dr. R.K. Gupta, who had been hiding since Saturday's operations, was arrested at a relative's home near Bilaspur city late Wednesday, said Dr. S.K. Mandal, the chief medical officer of Chhattisgarh state.

Cosmic first: European spacecraft lands on comet

The image released by the European Space Agency ESA on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 shows an artist rendering by the ATG medialab depicting lander Philae separating from Rosetta mother spaceship and descending to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. European Space Agency said Wednesday that the landing craft separated from Rosetta probe for descent to comet 67P.
Landing with a bounce after traveling 4 billion miles, a European spacecraft made history Wednesday by successfully reaching the icy, dusty surface of a speeding comet — a cosmic first designed to answer big questions about the universe.

Scientists: US-China pact won't slow warming much

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum into the global fight against climate change ahead of high-stakes climate negotiations next year.
Don't expect the landmark U.S.-China climate change agreement to nudge the world's rising thermostat downward much on its own, scientists say.
While they hail it as a start, experts who study heat-trapping carbon dioxide don't see the deal, announced Wednesday in Beijing, making significant progress without other countries joining in.
The math shows that even with the agreement, the globe is still rushing toward another 2-degree temperature rise — a level that world leaders have pledged to avoid as too dangerous.